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Recycling guide

Image 1 for Recycling guide
Untitled Document

Asbestos

 

•Asbestos is a building insulation material used before the 1970’s.
•There are 3 types – white, blue and brown.
•Removal of asbestos can disturb the fibres of which it is made; these fibres can be harmful if they are breathed in.
•Use a facemask and gloves when handling asbestos.
•Keep asbestos damp and contained in a plastic bag when transporting, this will reduce airborne fibres.
•Some skip companies will safely remove asbestos, such as SkipHireUK.
•Some councils will accept asbestos at their household waste recycling centres.
•Contact your local council for further advice on the removal of asbestos.

 

Batteries

 

• All waste batteries are classified as hazardous waste and recycling is always the best option.
• Ordinary household batteries do contain some hazardous chemicals so ideally should not be thrown out with the day to day rubbish.
• Rechargeable batteries contain harmful metals, so should never be thrown away with daily rubbish, they should be returned to manufacturer for disposal or recycled elsewhere.
• Local councils or garages sometimes offer battery-recycling services.
• Contact your local council to see if they are running a battery collection scheme.
• Contact the battery manufacturer for further recycling advice.
• Ordinary batteries require a lot of energy to make, so in order to save energy, use rechargeable batteries and electricity mains instead of ordinary batteries.
• Rechargable batteries are the most environmentally friendly option as can last for up to several hundred charging cycles resulting in less waste being produced.

Building Materials

 

•Buildings are made from many materials, many of which are recyclable such as metal, wood, glass, etc. Recycle these materials accordingly.
•Architectural salvage yards may take some items for reselling.
•Many building materials can be reused, such as bricks and wood.

Contact the Association for Environmentally Conscious Building for further advice on recycling:

Association for Environmentally Conscious Building
PO Box 32
Llandysul
SA44 5ZA

0845 456 9773

Clinical Waste

 

•Clinical waste such as nappies, sanitary waste and medical supplies have the potential to be infectious so must be disposed of using special methods.
•Be very careful when disposing of needles and syringes.
•Look for doctors or manufacturer instructions of how to dispose of medical waste on the packaging containers.
•Medicine containers can be recycled accordingly once it is empty.
•Contact your local council to see if they offer free medical waste collection.
•Some companies are currently implementing clinical waste treatment schemes, such as Medical Waste Solutions Ltd.

Composting

 

Composting is an excellent way to recycle kitchen and garden waste. It is very easy to build your own compost bin and use the compost to help your garden grow.

How Composting Works

Composting is the decomposition of materials that originated from animals and plants. These organic materials can be things such as plant trimmings, vegetable cuttings, eggshells and teabags. The composting process produces a dark, crumbly matter that can be used as fertiliser in garden soil. The main stages of composting are:
•Adding organic materials to a compost bin
•Micro-organisms, such as bacteria and fungi, break sown the soft material.
•This causes the compost pile to heat to around 60°C. This is the ideal temperature for micro-organisms to work at.
•The compost pile then cools to below 30°C.
•Small creatures such as worms and insects then break down the tougher material.
•The whole process usually takes about 3 – 9 months, and results in a nutrient-rich fertiliser to use in your garden.
•The compost that is ready to use can be taken from the bottom of the pile, leaving the rest to finish the process.

How to Build a Compost Bin
•You can buy a compost bin or build your own. Compost bins are usually sold at DIY and gardening stores.
•Build a compost bin by creating a frame out of wood and attach it to the ground using posts.
•Your compost bin should be able to hold about 200-300 litres, try and use a bin with a lid to keep out the rain.
•The compost bin should be placed in a well-lit and well-drained area of the garden.
•Try and keep the compost bin out of the wind.
•Improve drainage by breaking up the soil underneath the compost bin.

What You Should and Shouldn’t Compost

What to add to your compost pile:
•Hair and fur
•Shredded paper
•Straw and hay
•Animal bedding and sawdust
•Crushed egg shells
•Grass and plant cuttings
•Raw fruit and vegetable trimmings
•Teabags and coffee granules
•Horse manure
•Leaves

What not to add to your compost pile:
•Meat or fish
•Coal Ash
•Animal waste
•Nappies and used tissues
•Dairy products
•Cooked foods
•Coloured or treated paper
•Chemically treated wood
•Diseased plants
•Persistent weeds

Other composting options

Most composting systems don’t allow you to compost cooked food and meat products. However, the Swedish JK125 and JK270 domestic composters from
SmartSoil Ltd will enable you turn ALL your kitchen waste into a nutritious soil-improving compost in just a few weeks. Details can be found on
SmartSoil’s website where you can also find details of a fully automated community composter that will take up to 50 kg of catering waste per day.

A Green Cone or a Green Johanna also allow you to compost all your food products. These unique systems use a combination of solar energy, oxygen and natural bacteria which digests all food waste, created by the average family/household, including all cooked and uncooked meat, bones, fish, dairy, bread pasta, vegetables and fruit into either its natural components of water and carbon dioxide with a minimal residue (Green Cone) or when garden waste is added, into a rich compost (Green Johanna). Both products are made using recycled materials. Visit www.greencone.com for more information.

Computers

 

 

Electronic rubbish, and computer equipment in particular, is a rapidly expanding stream of UK waste. Low prices allow consumers to replace "gadgets" often, and rapid technological change means there are always newer, better, more powerful products on the market. The result is a burgeoning computer waste mountain. Up to 20 million “obsolete” PCs are discarded annually in the USA alone.

Why is it important to recycle computer equipment?

Also known as e-waste, discarded computer equipment comprises monitors, printers, hard drives and circuit boards. Such items should on no account be thrown out with your household rubbish because they contain toxic substances, and are effectively hazardous waste. E-waste often ends up in the developing world, and the UN’s Environment Programme is alarmed by the amount of electronic goods which is improperly disposed of overseas. There is increasing concern about the pollution caused by hazardous chemicals and heavy metals in Africa, Asia and South America.

What’s in my PC?

Material

Proportion

Plastic
Ferrous metals
Non-ferrous metals
Electronic boards
Glass

23%
32%
18%
12%
15%

A single computer can contain up to 2kg of lead, and the complex mixture of materials make PCs very difficult to recycle.

New legislation

New legislation came into force in 2007 to cover waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). The regulations have significant implications those who treat or recover WEEE, and stipulate that users must store, collect, treat, recycle and dispose of WEEE separately from other waste. It is now a requirement that you obtain and keep proof that your WEEE was given to a waste management company, and was treated and disposed of in an environmentally sound way. You can read the full regulations online.

Disposal options

You can dispose of computer waste by returning the product to the manufacturer, taking the item to a professional waste disposal facility or donating the goods to a non-profit organisation.

Manufacturer disposal

Increasingly, manufacturers of electronic goods incorporate e-waste management into their environmental policies and operate consumer recycling schemes. Dell, for example, cover the cost of home pick-up, shipping to the recycling centre, and recycling of any obsolete equipment. The goods are “de- manufactured”, and sorted according to type or material. Materials like steel and aluminium are then re-cycled to make new products, from car parts to plastic toys. Meanwhile non-reusable substances are disposed of in an environmentally sound manner. Another big brand, Hewlett Packard, recycled over 74 million kilograms of electronics in 2005. Since beginning the program 20 years ago, HP has expanded recycling operations to more than 40 world regions. These schemes help to:
• reduce of the volume of waste which ends up in landfill sites
• cut down on the amount of raw materials needed for the manufacture of new products
• make recycling convenient for the consumer

Professional waste disposal

The process is the same as with a manufacturer scheme, but you may have to pay for collection and disposal of the waste. There are quite a few waste disposal cowboys out there, so you should check that the company:
• complies with WEEE and other relevant legislation.
• can provide details of their own Waste Carriers License, and details of any overseas partners they may use. Check with Basel Action Network for details of those countries which have not signed up to a convention to prevent hazardous waste trafficking.

You can search using this list of UK computer recycling and refurbishing outfits.

Donation to charity

A number of non-profit organisations collect electronic equipment including computers and printers, either for reuse or for de-manufacture and recycling. Recipients pay nothing for the equipment or buy it at a heavily discounted rate. Developing countries benefit most from these schemes, but recipients also include UK community groups.

If you decide to donate your PC to charity, be sure to check that:
• Appropriate security measures are in place to prevent unauthorised access, alteration or accidental loss or destruction of personal data, which is a legal requirement under the 1998 Data Protection Act. Reformatting the hard drive is not sufficient to permanently destroy all data.
• The organisation has a strategy for waste management once the PC becomes obsolete. It’s all very well sending computers to Nigeria to help train students in IT, but what happens when the equipment becomes obsolete? Is there a programme for disposal or will your donation just end up as e-waste in a backyard 3000 miles away?

In the UK there are now more than fifty non-profit organisations which collect, refurbish and supply PCs. A well-established choice is Computer Aid International, which has distributed over 150,000 PCs in over 100 countries, making it the global leader in not-for- profit supply of IT equipment.

OFFERS/Ex-IT is a a London based reuse/recycling project which has been set up to assist students, people on low income, Voluntary Sector Organisations (VSO’s), small start-up businesses to gain access to low cost ICT and office furniture. The project has been in action since 1996, and as a whole has helped over 5000 VSO’s, small businesses and students to gain access to low cost, reliable ICT and office fittings.

The project’s main objective is to divert WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) and surplus office fittings and furniture away from landfill and back into reuse. They make recycling very easy by even arranging collections of computers, consumer electronics and office furniture.

Digital Links is a registered charity and provides an IT disposal service to British schools and companies. Digital Links redistributes the computers to schools and community projects in the developing world. At present they have already distributed over 75,000 computers in just five years.

Electrical Equipment

 

•Most electrical equipment can be reused or broken down into parts.
•If the electrical equipment is still in full working order, sell it in a car boot sale or donate it to a charity shop.
•Contact your retailer as they may take back old products.
•Some councils accept electrical equipment at their waste recycling centres.
•Always try to repair items rather than throwing them away, others may find a use for the item when you no longer want it.
•Try to buy electrical items that have a long life span

Furniture

 

•Donate usable furniture to charity shops, schools, community centres, friends or neighbours.
•Sell furniture at garage sales or in auctions.
•Clean and repair broken furniture before you sell/donate it.
•Before you sell/donate your furniture, make sure it has the kite mark of approval to show that it meets British safety standards.

Contact the Furniture Reuse Network for further information on recycling furniture:

FRN
48-54 West Street
St Philips
Bristol
BS2 0BL

0117 954 3571

OFFERS is the first UK scheme, which was specifically set up to promote the reuse of office furniture and equipment. Since 1996 OFFERS has been assisting businesses and organisations in London to divert office furniture and equipment from landfill. Unwanted items are collected and then passed on to community, voluntary sector groups and small start-up businesses to maximise the environmental and social benefits of reuse.

Glass

 

•Glass is separated into 3 colours: green, brown and clear.
•Take great care when handling broken glass, wear gloves if possible.
•Deposit glass at your nearest recycling bank by throwing them into the appropriate container.
•Many supermarkets have glass- recycling banks, enabling you to recycle glass on your weekly shop.
•Most home recycle bins, provided by your local council, usually accept glass.
•Make sure you wash out the bottle or jar before putting it into recycling bins.
•Reuse glass whenever possible. Jars can be used as small containers and bottles can be used as vases.

Metal

 

•Metal is usually separated into 2 groups: aluminium and steel.
•You can test which metal your waste is by using a magnet. Aluminium metal is non-magnetic whereas steel is magnetic.
•There may be a symbol, such as an alu mark, on the product to indicate what metal it is made from.
•Drink cans are usually made from aluminium and food cans are usually made from steel.
•Most home recycling bins, provided by your local council, usually accept metal.
•Deposit used cans at your local recycling bank.
•Make sure drink and food cans are clean before recycling.
•Aerosol containers can be recycled, but only when they are completely empty.
•Metallic plastic film, such as chocolate wrappers, cannot be recycled.
•Find out if there is a ‘cash for cans’ scheme operating near you.

Mobiles

 

• Most people in the UK now own a mobile phone and they can be recycled.
• Donate old mobile phones to friends or family.
• Many manufacturers take back old mobile phones for recycling.
• Some companies have set up mobile phone recycling schemes.

Mopay

 

Mopay will collect and recycle your old mobile phones in return for cash and are one of the largest companies providing this service in the UK, as they offer some great prices for your mobile.

Certain handsets can fetch up to £200, and you needn’t worry if your phone is not in the best working order as they will often buy phones that don’t work as well, or have damage to them, as long as it is not beyond economical repair. You can check the grading category that your phone might fall into before sending it off. Mopay will try to reuse your mobile phone, and if it can’t be resued, then it will be broken down and it’s parts recycled, in line with the WEEE directive, making this a great opion for those wanting to help the environment! Read more information on how the Mopay service works.

Choose Mopay for:
•You can choose from a selection of payment options, including Marks & Spencer gift vouchers, Arcadia Group Gift Cards, electronic bank transfer (BACS), music credit cash collection at post office branches.
•Reliable company who offer a price promise, and as long as your phone has been graded correctly you will be paid the price you see online!
•Freepost address, and a very rapid 3 day payment once your phone has been recieved.
•Help the environment as all mobile phones are disposed of correctly.

Envirofone

Another site offering a phone recycling service where you can make money on your old phone is envirofone.com. The service works in a similar way, but this site is slightly better as you can search for your phone by make and model and see pictures of the phones to ensure you have the correct one. This helps if you are unsure of the make and model.

Once you have found your phone you will see the amount of epoints it is worth. You can either collect epoints or redeeem them right away. They can be converted to cash which will be sent out to you in the form of a cheque within 20 days of receipt of your phone, or you can use them to spend in Argos.

The points system is good if you have several phones of low value and want to trade a few in over a period of time until there is a decent amount to redeem as cash or argos credit. They have a good reminder feature too where they will email you in 1-12 months depending on when your phone is next up for upgrading.

Envirofone incentives include:
• Photos of phones so easy to locate your model
• Value can be seem straight away on the site
• They pay postage costs
• Charity donation by envirofone with every phone

Carbon Neutral

The Carbon Neutral company will recycle your mobile phone if you send it to:

Greener Solutions

(Future Forests Offer)

Freepost LONI7592

PO Box 32343

London

SW17 9ZZ

See www.carbonneutral.com for further details.

Turn On Your Mobile

The company ‘Turn On Your Mobile’ also have a recycling scheme where you can exchange your mobile phones for cash. See www.recyclemymobile.co.uk for full details.

You can search for your phones make and model on the site and once you have found it, you can send a mail for a quote via a form on the phone giving your name and contact details and as much information about the phone/s as possible (ie: general condition and if it is full working condition or if it has any faults). You can alternatively call the freephone number or visit their service centre.(Wimbledon – London)

You will then be emailed back with your quote and details of what you need to do if you would like to send your phone off. The site states it will pay within 72 hours and offers several incentives including:
• Freepost service if your handset is only worth a low value
• Special delivery charges refunded if the handset you send is high value
• Courier service for 10 phones or more – good for businesses
• Refund cheque can be made out to a charity of your choice if you prefer

Recycling Appeal

The Recycling Appeal collects mobile phones as well as PDAs and printer cartridges for reuse and recycling. They raise funds for charity whilst helping the environment at the same time. The Recycling Appeal has generated over £2 million for partner organisations since 1999.

They make recycling your old phones and printer cartridges easy by offering free collection envelopes. You simply need to pop your items into a freepost envelope and put it in the post. You can call up or fill out an online form to get an envelope sent out to you. If you have large quantities of items to send, the Recycling Appeal will arrange for a courier to come and collect them from you free of charge.

Recycling Appeal incentives include:
• Freepost envelopes or free collection for multiple items
• Choose your appeal from a number of charities
• Recycle phones, PDAs and printer cartridges

Each One Counts

The Each One Counts scheme collects mobile phones (and printer cartridges) for reuse and gives a donation to your chosen charity for every recyclable item received. Over £3 million has been raised for charities since 1995.

Recycling is made easy as you can order freepost bags online for your chosen charity and free collections can be arranged for larger quantities.

Each One Counts incentives include:
• Freepost bags or free collection for multiple items
• Choose your charity to support
• Weekly competition for recyclers
• Recycle printer cartridges and mobile phones
• Gift Aid can be added to your donation

Support Your School

Support Your School is a free service set up specifically to give schools the opportunity to raise funds for themselves through the recycling of used inkjet printer cartridges and unwanted mobile phones.

Support Your School rewards schools with £1 for every cartridge and £3 for every mobile phone successfully recycled and reused. The scheme is supported with an interactive website with support materials; it also includes a full list of items that are suitable for recycling and details of how much the school has raised.

Schools sign up online and order their free recycling pack containing everything they need to recycle for a year. Parents and businesses are also encouraged to sign up online and receive their free pack to recycle from work and support their chosen local school.

The scheme launches from January 2010

Paint/Oil

 

•Waste such as paint, paintbrushes, car oil and oil filters have to be carefully disposed of, as they can be very damaging to the environment.
•Don’t pour oil or paint down the drain.
•Donate unwanted paints and varnishes, as others can reuse them.
•Look for disposal or recycling instructions on the packaging of the product.
•Civic amenity sites often take engine oil for recycling.
•Buy products in bulk whenever possible to reduce packaging waste.
•Use eco-friendly alternatives whenever possible.

Reusing Paint

Community RePaint is a network of paint reuse schemes across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

The purpose of the project is to collect leftover reusable paint from householders, and redistribute it to those who need paint but
cannot afford it. This site will tell you more about the scheme and help you find the nearest RePaint scheme to you.

Recycling Engine Oil

It is important that you recycle your engine oil correctly as even a small amount of oil can cause damage to the environment as well as making a noticable mess.

The Oil Care Campaign has been set up by the Environment Agency, in association with SEPA in Scotland and Environment and Heritage Service (EHS) in Northern Ireland, to try and reduce pollution from oil and to help people dispose of their engine oil safely and correctly. On the Oilcare site there is a oil bank locator where you can type in your postcode and find the nearest place to take your used engine oil to for safe disposal.

Remember: UK oil banks are for waste engine oil, not cooking oil, thinners, white spirit, paint or any other chemical.

Paper

 

•Paper is separated into the following groups: ?Magazines
?Newspapers
?Office paper
?Cardboard
?Phone directories

•Deposit used paper at your local recycling bank.
•Most home recycling bins, provided by your local council, usually accept paper products.
•Only recycle gummed paper if specified, such as envelopes and stickers.
•Reduce paper waste by cancelling unwanted deliveries, or read news online as opposed to buying newspapers.
•Put a ‘no junk mail please’ sign on your letter box to reduce unwanted deliveries.
•Reuse paper around the home as scrap paper or packing material. Envelopes can also be reused.
•Set your printer to print on both sides of the paper.
•Buy recycled paper whenever possible.

 

Plastic

 

•There are about 50 different types of plastic. The main types include: ? HDPE – Opaque bottles
?PVC – Transparent bottles, with a seam running across the base
?PET – Transparent bottles, with a hard moulded spot in the centre of the base

•If your home recycling bin doesn’t take plastic bottles, then deposit them at your local recycling bank.
•Clean bottles before recycling them.
•Buy plastic bottles in bulk whenever possible to reduce packaging waste.
•Carriers can be reused next time you’re at the shops, or deposit used ones at collection points provided by some supermarkets.

Statistics

Some interesting information and statistics about recycling plastic can be found on the British Plastics Federation website here.

Reverse Vending Machines

A growing recycling option which will hopefully become more and more widespread in the UK are Reverse Vending Machines (RVMs), which collect plastics for recycling. The Reverse Vending Corporation provide fully automated Reverse Vending Machines which utilise advanced technology to identify, sort, collect, process and recycle used beverage containers including cans, glass bottles, PET (plastic) bottles and vending cups. These machines have been used in Europe for many years, often as part of a ‘refund for your empties’ scheme, encouraging people to put their bottles in to get money back. The RVC hope to have over 300 RVMs operating in schools by the end of this year. Placed in offices, shops and schools, these machines could make recycling a lot easier.

 

Printer Cartridges

 

 

24 million homes in the UK have a personal computer and 90% of those homes have printers. The average household uses 2-3 inkjet cartridges a year and many offices use large numbers of laser cartridges. Only 15% of the 65 million printer cartridges that are sold in the UK are recycled which means the rest end up in landfill sites and this is major bad news as the plastic used in a typical cartridge is made of engineering grade polymers and is expected to take up to 1000 years to decompose!

Recycling printer cartridges really is worthwhile as cartridges can be expensive and remanufactured printer cartridges can cost as little as 10% of what original cartridges do. By lessening the amount of cartridges ending up in landfill sites, you are being kinder to the environment too.

Recycling Appeal

The Recycling Appeal collects printer cartridges (as well as mobile phones and PDAs) for reuse and recycling. They raise funds for charity whilst helping the environment at the same time. The Recycling Appeal has generated over £2 million for partner organisations since 1999.

They make recycling your old printer cartridges easy by offering free collection envelopes. You simply need to pop your items into a freepost envelope and put it in the post. You can call up or fill out an online form to get an envelope sent out to you. If you have large quantities of items to send, the Recycling Appeal will arrange for a courier to come and collect them from you free of charge.
Recycling Appeal incentives include:
• Freepost envelopes or free collection for multiple items
• Choose your appeal from a number of charities
• Recycle phones, PDAs and printer cartridges

Each One Counts

The Each One Counts scheme collects printer cartridges (and mobile phones) for reuse and gives a donation to your chosen charity for every recyclable item received. Over £3 million has been raised for charities since 1995.

Recycling is made easy as you can order freepost bags online for your chosen charity and free collections can be arranged for larger quantities.

Each One Counts incentives include:
• Freepost bags or free collection for multiple items
• Choose your charity to support
• Weekly competition for recyclers
• Recycle printer cartridges and mobile phones
• Gift Aid can be added to your donation

Support Your School

Support Your School is a free service set up specifically to give schools the opportunity to raise funds for themselves through the recycling of used inkjet printer cartridges and unwanted mobile phones.

Support Your School rewards schools with £1 for every cartridge and £3 for every mobile phone successfully recycled and reused. The scheme is supported with an interactive website with support materials; it also includes a full list of items that are suitable for recycling and details of how much the school has raised.

Schools sign up online and order their free recycling pack containing everything they need to recycle for a year. Parents and businesses are also encouraged to sign up online and receive their free pack to recycle from work and support their chosen local school.

The scheme launches from January 2010

 

Recycling Banks

 

As well as home recycling bins, there are many recycling banks across the UK that can be used to recycle different materials. They are located on streets across the UK as well as in supermarkets and outside housing estates.

Most recycling banks are emptied on a regular basis. However, if you do come across one that is over-flowing, contact your local council who will arrange for the bank to be emptied. You can also contact your local council to report vandalism to the recycle banks.

To find out where your local recycling bank is or if you want to know which materials can be recycled where, check the recycling point search here

 

Textiles

 

•Most home recycling bins, provided by your local council, accept old clothes and textiles. Recycling banks may also accept old clothes.
•Donate old clothes to charity shops or take them to a jumble sale.
•Only donate clothes that are still usable.
•Old clothes can be used to make other textile items, such as cushion covers or cleaning cloths.
•When donating shoes, make sure they are tied together so they don’t separate.

Contact the Textile Recycling Association for further details:

Textile Recycling Association
PO Box 965
Maidstone
Kent
ME17 3WD

Tel:0870 042 8276
Fax:0845 600 8276
Email: info@textile- recycling.org.uk
Website: www.textile- recycling.org.uk

 

Vehicles

 

• Up to 80% of a vehicle can be recycled, see below for where to take your vehicle for recycling.
• Try and fix your vehicle instead of throwing it away.
• Sell unwanted vehicles.
• Report abandoned vehicles to your local council for removal.
• Engine oil can be recycled at civic amenity sites.
• Contact your local council for further advice on recycling vehicles and their components.

There are hundreds of approved vehicle dismantlers, recyclers and salvage sites across the UK. Find your nearest site here.

Visit The Motor Vehicle Dismantlers Association website for a full list of members, all of whom are properly licensed by the Environment Agency and can treat End of Life Vehicles in accordance with all current legislation, including issuing the DVLA required Certificate of Destruction.

Read about the new EU legislation which has recently come into force and aims to improve the recycling process for old vehicles.

Metro Salvage offers a free environmentally friendly car recycling service. They simply pickup your vehicle within 3 days and dismantle it in a safe and friendly manor. If you would like to have your car recycled, then please fill out the form.

Scrap Car is a way to dispose of your vehicle in a responsible and legal way. In most areas you will get a choice of professionals that will dismantle and recycle the many parts of your vehicle reducing the need to manufacture new.

 

Wood

 

• Take wood to civic amenity sites for recycling.
• Wood can often be reused to make other items, such as a bird table for your garden.
• Wood can often be added to your compost heap, such as sawdust and wood shavings.
• Buy recycled wood whenever possible.

Recycled Wood Furniture

Recycled wood can be used to produce unique eco-friendly furniture, some great examples can be seen at reelfurniture.co.uk
Reelfurniture creates recycled wooden furniture for home and garden with the knowledge that they are acting positively to protect timber resources and conserve our forests.

Pallet Recycling

Recycling old or damaged pallets prevents unnecessary landfill and reduces the need to chop down trees for new wood to make new pallets. There are companies that offer pallet recycling absolutely free, such as Edwards & Ross Pallets.