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We meet on the 1st Thursday of the month, upstairs function room in Henry Boons pub which is next to Westgate Train Station Wakefield The moot starts from 7.30pm with any organised discussions/workshops commencing from 8pm Topics for discussion are decided by the group as a whole and input is always welcome! We aim to create a friendly environment for Pagans to meet, learn from each other and discover what is going on in the local Pagan community. We are an open group for open minded people on all walks of the Pagan path.

Paganism is the oldest religion known to humanity. Its origins are obscure, but conjectured to have arisen with humanity's own desire to explore the unknown, and seek unity with the divine force (however that may be perceived). Therefore, Paganism has no founder or founders, no earthly leaders, no prophets, no messiahs, and no saints. The word Pagan is derived from the Latin Paganus, "a civilian", and from Pagus, "a village". This delineates Pagans as those who are from a village, or more commonly, simply country- dwellers. Whilst the majority of Pagans today - like the majority of the population - live in towns, this term accurately describes the Pagan heritage, and the affinity that modern Pagans feel with the natural environment. Thus modern Pagans follow a religion that is as old as humanity itself, but whose practices have been adapted to suit life in the modern world. The concepts that were vital to sustaining life in bygone times - as in the hunter-gatherer, or agricultural, societies -are revered, and their principles have been retained; however, we accept that in practice, our modern lives are sustained in very different ways. Modern Pagans are people who have made a positive choice to follow a path of individual spiritual growth that is in harmony with the Earth upon which we live. Many people have become aware of a spiritual void in their lives, and have discovered, in Paganism, a religion of joy and love, which allows self-expression, but also encourages social and environmental responsibility. Modern Pagans are drawn from all walks of life. For more information re Paganism you may like to look at the NE Pagan Fellowship web site http://nepaganfellowship.webs.com/aboutp aganism.htm Wakefield moot meets up on the 1st Thursday of the month, upstairs function room in Henry Boons pub which is next to Westgate Train Station. The moot starts from 7.30pm with any organised discussions/workshops commencing from 8pm Topics for discussion are decided by the group as a whole and input is always welcome! We aim to create a friendly environment for Pagans to meet, learn from each other and discover what is going on in the local Pagan community. We are an open group for open minded people on all walks of the Pagan path.

FEBRUARY: IMBOLC TO TERMINALIA February is named after the ancient Roman purification festival of Februa and is a time to honour the ancestors and orgiastically invoke the powers of fertility. Pagan Festivals and Holy Days in February Although February is named after the ancient Roman purification festival of Februa, February is also a month sacred to the gods Mars (as Quirinus, or Romulus) and Juno, the wife of Jupiter. According to Ancient Roman tradition February is a month in which particular reverence was shown to the spirits of deceased ancestors. In a familiar cultural dichotomy in which both death and life were celebrated, this was a month devoted to fertility, both of men and women, and of the land. Many of these rites had residual agricultural overtones. It may be more than coincidence that the dead, who were either buried or considered to be in the 'underworld', and the fruits of agriculture, both relate to the earth. February was the last month in the Roman calendar, but also the beginning of spring: the first day of spring was celebrated on February 5 (the Nones). According to Ovid, the Latin word februa ('the means of purification') derived from an older Etruscan word meaning purgamentum ('purging'). It was accordingly a month of 'spring cleaning' with purifcation and fertility rituals. The month of February is called Solmonath (meaning 'Sun month') in Anglo-Saxon and was thought to have been dedicated to the Goddess Sjofn. Solmonath notes the gradual return of light after the darkness of midwinter. In modern Asatru calendars February is known as Horning, from Horn, the turn of the year. It is celebrated as a time of purification. February is Saxon cake month, when cakes are offered to the Gods and Goddesses for prosperity and good luck. Roman Calendar 1: Kalends of February 2: Festival of Juno Februa 5: Nones of February (First Day of Spring) 9: Feast of Apollo 12: Festival of Diana (Luna) 13: Ides of February Festivals of Parentalia and the orgiastic festival of Juno Februa begin 14: Orgiastic festival of Juno Februa ends Day sacred to Juno-Lupa 15: Lupercalia 17: Fornacalia 18: Rites of Tacita 19: Birth of Minerva 21: Festival of Parentalia ends Festival of Feralia 22: Festival of Caristia 23: Festival of Terminalia 24: The Regifugium 27: The Equirria 28: Pridie Kalendas Martius (Day Before the Kalends of March) Other Dates 1: Lesser Eleusinian Mysteries begin (Ancient Greek) 2: Imbolc (Celtic/Wiccan) 3: Powamu (Hopi). End of the Lesser Eleusinian Mysteries (Ancient Greek) 6: Festival of Aphrodite (Ancient Greek) 9: Dahini Day (Tibetan) 12: Festival of Artemis, Goddess of the Moon (Ancient Greek) Death of Gerald Gardner (Wiccan) 13: Anthesterion Nourmenia - festival honouring all of the Gods and Goddesses (Ancient Greek) 14: St Valentine's Day Trifon Zarezan, Festival of Dionysos (Ancient Greek) Valisblot, Feast Day of Vali (Norse) 15: Sigfrid's Day (Norse/Odinism) 16: Fumi-e (Japanese) 17: Festival of Shesmu, God of the Wine Press (Ancient Egyptian) Festival of Aphrodite and Eros (Ancient Greek) 18: Festival of Artemis (Ancient Greek) Spenta Armaiti (Zoroastrian) 25: Day of Nut (Ancient Egyptian) 28: Conception of Buddha (Tibetan) Anniversaries Witchcraft Trials Salem 1692 Mid-February, 1692: Doctor Griggs attends the 'afflicted' girls and suggests that witchcraft may be the cause of their strange behaviour. 25th February, 1692: Tituba, at the request of neighbour Mary Sibley, bakes a 'witch cake' made with urine from the bewitched and feeds it to a dog. According to an English folk remedy, this would counteract the spell put on Elizabeth and Abigail. Late-February, 1692: Elizabeth identifies Tituba as her bewitcher under pressure from ministers and townspeople. The girls later accuse Sarah Good and Sarah Osborne of witchcraft. 29th February, 1692: arrest warrants are issued for Tituba, Sarah Good and Sarah Osborne.

contact : David
Tel : 07958083224
Email : silverbugle@aol.com


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